Tim Henman Foundation

What We Do

The Tim Henman Foundation is a youth charity with the mission of transforming the lives of vulnerable & disadvantaged young people by improving mental & physical health and creating sporting & educational opportunities.

We deliver activity-based sports programmes, bespoke programmes to deserving and in need individuals and special needs programmes to profoundly disabled and life limited youngsters.

The Tim Henman Foundation is a youth charity with the mission of transforming the lives of vulnerable & disadvantaged young people by improving mental & physical health and creating sporting & educational opportunities.
We deliver activity-based sports programmes, bespoke programmes to deserving and in need individuals and special needs programmes to profoundly disabled and life limited youngsters.

THF Values & Beliefs

And Why We Do What We Do

We believe in the power of sport and the benefits that it brings to young people.
And so THF aims to bridge the gaps that exist between those who are disadvantaged and those who are advantaged and create more opportunities for young people.
Find Out Why We Do It
We appreciate the value of positive role models.
That is why we work with coaches, teachers, mentors who can offer the positive guidance they may not get elsewhere.
Find Out Why We Do It
We understand the important work that community-led organisations do for vulnerable and disadvantaged young people.
So we partner with these organisations to support them and create more opportunities for young people who need it most.
Find Out Why We Do It
We understand how important mental health is to young people’s wellbeing, as well as physical health.
And so we put in place workshops and mentoring schemes to help educate and provide tools for young people.
Find Out Why We Do It
We understand that not all young people born in deprived areas are disadvantaged.
But we seek to find those who are in vulnerable circumstances and provide the required support to help them thrive.
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We value education and how it enriches and enhances young people's lives.
And so we aim to provide bespoke opportunities to deserving and in need young people to enhance their future prospects and increase opportunities for aspiring youngsters.
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We care about young people who are profoundly disabled and life limited
That is why we work collaboratively to make a meaningful difference to the care offering and their families.
Find Out Why We Do It
THF also cares about vulnerable young people with special needs and disabilities.
And so THF steps in to provide meaningful funding and opportunities to enhance their provision.
Find Out Why We Do It

Our Programmes

Partner_Programmes

Partner
Programmes

Activity-based sports programmes delivered directly to deprived areas with community-led partners creating regular opportunities to participate and progress.

With an additional service provision of mentorship workshops where we educate on areas in and around mental health.

Bespoke_Programmes

Bespoke Programmes

Offering specific and specialist support for deserving and in need young people.

With an additional service provision of individual mentoring where we provide positive guidance to those we support.

SEN_Programmes White

Special Needs Programmes

Providing meaningful funding to partners who are dedicated to supporting profoundly disabled and life limited youngsters.

Our Partners

THF forms collaborative relationships with partners to deliver high-impact programmes which support both the organisation and reach vulnerable & disadvantaged young people.

We have a set of criteria to ensure we only work with the most effective partners and inspirational coaches, teachers, mentors so we can support their work and reach the young people who need our support the most.

Our Partners

THF forms collaborative relationships with partners to deliver high-impact programmes which support both the organisation and reach vulnerable & disadvantaged young people.

We have a set of criteria to ensure we only work with the most effective partners and inspirational coaches, teachers, mentors so we can support their work and reach the young people who need our support the most.

Impact

What is the issue?

Some context to our why

Unfortunately, there are substantial gaps in access to sporting activity, with young people from disadvantaged backgrounds less likely to take up sport (46%) than those from higher-income households (66%), and only half of those receiving free school meals (FSM) take part in sporting activity.

There are also gaps in provision shown by schools with the lowest proportion of FSM pupils being more likely (70%) to offer extra-curricular opportunities compared to those with high FSM rates (35%).

46%

less likely to take up sport if a young person is from a disadvantaged background

35%

school's likelihood of offering extra-curricular opportunities if high FSM rate

What is the issue?

Some context to our why

Unfortunately, 15% of young people claim they don’t have any role models at all, rising to 21% for those from poorer backgrounds.

21%

of young people from poor backgrounds don't have role models

What is the issue?

Some context to our why

Only 15% of sports organisations own their own facilities and this puts pressure on their finances.

Many of these highly-impactful organisations operate hand-to-mouth on limited resources – only 38% even have a reserves policy whilst 33% did not have enough reserves to cover three months running costs.

The people who run these organisations, and who many young people rely upon, are often volunteers and if paid, 60% of self-employed workers across the sports sector have no reserves and face substantial losses.

Asset holders face their own pressures, especially coming out of the pandemic where bills need to be met but income streams have been restricted.

15%

of sports organisations own their own facilities

33%

do not have enough reserves to cover three months costs

What is the issue?

Some context to our why

Coming out of months of lockdown, 80% of young people agreed that the coronavirus pandemic had made their mental health worse and 67% of young people believe that the pandemic will have a long-term negative effect on their mental health.

This includes anxieties from a fear for future work or loss of current education to social concerns and a worry of whether friendships will recover.

80%

of young people agree pandemic impacted their mental health

67%

believe the pandemic will have a long-term negative impact on their mental health

What is the issue?

Some context to our why

There are 4.3 million young people trapped in poverty. Certain groups are affected more than others – 46% of BAME young people are in poverty, 49% of children in lone-parent households are gripped by poverty and increasingly families with a disabled family member are on the rise.

But all in poverty will experience barriers to prevent their progress. 78% demonstrate fatigue, 75% struggle to concentrate, 57% experience hunger, 50% suffer from ill health and most of all, they are deprived of opportunity.

4.3m

young people trapped in poverty

46%

of BAME young people are in poverty

What is the issue?

Some context to our why

Unfortunately there are currently 728,000 of young people NEET (not in education, training or employment).

728,000

young people NEET

What is the issue?

Some context to our why

There is set to be an increase of 55% more young people in hospices over the next 10 years. The hospice sector will be required to raise an additional £597m per year in order to keep them open.

55%

more young people expected in hospices over the next decade

£597m

annual shortfall in funding to keep hospices open

What is the issue?

Some context to our why

There are financial barriers to getting the required specialist support or additional opportunities that young people with special needs and disabilities deserve.


Families face, on average, extra costs of £581 a month and for almost a quarter (24%) of families with disabled children, extra costs amount to over £1,000 a month.

£581

extra monthly costs for families of disabled children

24%

of families have costs of over £1,000 a month